Saturday, 21 May 2011

Spring Oak Leaf Wine

Recipe


1 gallon of oak leaves (Spring or Autumn)

4 oranges*

1 lemon*

4lbs sugar

Wine yeast


Wash the leaves in cold water removing all woody stalks, damaged leaves, caterpillars and other hedgerow stow aways (I found several green caterpillars and a black and red caterpillar of the White Ermine Moth). Place the prepared oak leaves into a gallon brewing bucket, cover in boiling water and leave over night.


Strain and separate the leaves from the fluid. The leaves can now be composted.


Add the liquid to a large pan, preferably stainless steel. If like me, you do not have a pan large enough, split the liquid between two pans and ensure that you spread the ingredients equally between the two pots.


Add sugar, juice of lemons and oranges, and thin peel. It is important to make sure that there is no white pith on the peel so I grated the white side of the peel until the pith has been removed and the peel is very thin.


Place some dried wine yeast into a glass with a little water that has been allowed to cool until hand hot from boiling. This activates the yeast.


Bring to the boil and simmer for 20 minutes. When cool pour the liquid through a muslin cloth into a demi John and add the yeast and water. Top up the demi john with cooled boiled water until almost full. Add air lock and bung.


Leave to ferment. When all fermentation has ceased rack off into wine bottles and leave for 6 months. The longer you can leave the wine the better it will taste.


When ready to drink reserve one bottle to enjoy with friends at a solstice celebration. Enjoy!




The same recipe can be found widely over the web and in hedgerow wine books. I used a 1970 copy of the Farmers Weekly Collection.


* When making I did not have any oranges so instead used 3 satsumas and 2 lemons. I'm sure it will still taste great!

22 comments:

Jasmine said...

Thank you for all those that have left comments and messages these past few weeks. I broke my computer so am unable to access my blog until the weekend when I visit relatives. Hope to back in operation soon xJ

Janine said...

I have a ? for you...do the oak leaves add a particular flavor? I love the idea of this!

Tammie Lee said...

I have never heard of oak wine, I am simply amazed!

Jasmine said...

Janine - Yes they do but I tasted it at an autumn equinox gathering alongside many other hedgerow wines so I cannot fully tell you what it tasted like. Lets just say that they were all good enough for me to want to make my own! x

Tammie, you can make wine with many hedgerow and wayside occupants. Its a very peaceful feeling gathering the ingredients and listening to the birds singing and the rustling of the wind. You would enjoy it! x

Sandra said...

I didn't know you could make wine from oak leaves!

Crafty Green Poet said...

sounsd a good drink!

Faerie Moon Creations said...

Wow! This is amazing. I've not heard of oak leaf wine - thank you for sharing this. Theresa

Jules Woolford said...

My father in law used to make this and it was amazing. Enjoy your wine and I hope your computer is well again soon.x

Debrina said...

You are an absolute inspiration you are! So great to see you in the Springtime having so much fin :-)

Tom said...

there's about a thousand kinds of oaks...any kind in particular?

GreenWhisper said...

i can imagine this tasting good :)
i was laying under a huge old oak tree while we were camping the other weekend...looking up and wondering if those wonderful spring green leaves could be used for anything..i didn't get round to checking it out, and then i seen this post.... :-) xx

Suzi Smith said...

looks tasty... how are you doing hun? just spotted this thought u might like x http://avalonyearning.blogspot.com/2011/05/oak-apple-day-may-29th.html

Harnett-Hargrove said...

Do I dare? -J

Jasmine said...

Tom - None of the recipes that I have looked through specify type of oak. In England the most common hedgerow oak is probably the Pedunculate Oak, which is what I used.

Heather Woollove said...

Wish I were closer, I'd plan a trip in a few months for a 'nip'!!
XXO-

sewa mobil said...

Nice article, thanks for the information.

Hanneke said...

Thank you for this recipe, I am making all sorts of wine for over 20 years now but never knew I could use
oak leaves.

Barb Forrister said...

Wow, you are amazing. Thanks for sharing. We are blessed with many oak trees. It is so refreshing to catch this recipe.

Arati said...

how amazing!

Anneke said...

hmmmm, i think, i will give this try.
it's looking good:))

Julia said...

Wow, Oak wine? How is it? How does it taste like? I never heard of it

luxury watches

ABtMS said...

I understand that yeasts love the tannins in oak, which are occasionally added to meads for that purpose, though I have never made any pure oak wine. Fresh oak leaves also make a very sweet tea by themselves.

Love the blog...please keep it up.